Tag Archives: HBU

A Journalism Student’s Thankful List (2014)

Screen Shot 2014-11-27 at 3.00.56 PMIt’s a miracle guys! We made it another year, and, more importantly, I remembered to keep up my “traditional Thanksgiving blog post.” Yes, I know this is only the second one, but still, given my memory, it’s a reason to celebrate!  Anyway, last year, my list was all about people, and no matter where I go in journalism, I will always be indebted to the people who have played a role in my “journey to journalism.” But this year’s list is going to be focused more on the things that challenged me.

Technology. The world of social media has definitely challenged this analytical brain. I’ve written quite a few posts about my experience with the media and technology (glitches and all). My rants about technology aside, I am so thankful for the way that it connects people around the world. A couple months ago, I had to make a really tough decision to transfer from my university. Knowing that I could keep in touch with my friends and mentors through social media, texting, Skyping, etc. made that transition a lot easier on me.

Houston Baptist University. My time at HBU, especially as EIC of The Collegian, has stretched me and challenged me in more ways than I could’ve imagined. From having to deal with a not-so-pleasant side of my school’s administration, to “being censored,” to deadlines, to classes, every single one of my experiences at HBU have played a vital role in developing who I have become today. The challenges from my time at HBU did not always come through obstacles and trials. In fact, some of the best challenges came from professors who cared enough about students to help them realize their full potential. Looking back, I realize that both the fun challenges and the “not-so-fun challenges” were equally valuable in their own way. I am just so thankful for my time spent there. Wherever I go, HBU will always be my launching pad – the place where it all began.

Change. Even as I’m typing this, I keep asking myself, “Really? Am I really thankful for change?” And the answer, even though it may be through gritted teeth, is a resounding YES. Change is inevitable, and boy was this year marked with change for me. In the span of a week, I transferred universities, changed majors, and moved states. I’m not going to lie. It was hard, and sometimes still is. However, today I can say I am thankful for change because it opens new doors and brings about opportunities I would’ve never come across if I stayed in the same place forever. Whether it is willingly or reluctantly, we all experience change. We can’t avoid it, but what we can do is decide how we respond to it. I’ll be the first to admit, I don’t always respond well to change; however, I do know that a change in circumstances isn’t necessarily the end. In fact, it almost always proves itself to be a new beginning in disguise.

My challenge to you today is to find at least one challenge to be thankful for. It’s easy (and necessary) to rejoice about the great moments, but let’s not overlook the role that trials and obstacles play in shaping and impacting our lives. Feel free to share below; I’d love to hear how you are thankful for your challenges!

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It Takes a Village to… Run a Paper

While the beginning of this semester was filled with unexpected changes, there was one major change that I had all summer to prepare for — no longer being editor-in-chief of my university’s newspaper. Now, when I say that I “prepared for” leaving this position, I really mean I had a lot of time to reflect over my experience.

Little did I know that when I joined The Collegian, I would not only gain journalistic experience, but I would also learn many life lessons along the way. And to keep it exciting and interesting, a majority of these lessons came out of the most peculiar sources, from rotten pumpkins to secret menus and everything in between.

Of all the lessons that I’ve learned from my time at The Collegian, there is one lesson that surpasses them all: You can’t do it alone. Both in life, and definitely in a newspaper or magazine or whatever you’re trying to produce, it all won’t happen without a team.The moments I tried to do everything on my own, I found myself burnt out and stressed. Thankfully, I was blessed with a loyal team, or rather, family, who kept me sane and made the stressful times a little more enjoyable by either lightening the mood with some random outburst of song and Russian accents or lightening my load by being so ready and willing to help wherever needed.

(Most of) the people behind the paper. This was taken in Austin when we took a staff trip to attend the 2014 ISOJ conference.

(Most of) the people behind the paper. This was taken in Austin when we took a staff trip to attend the 2014 ISOJ conference.

Looking back, I know that, without a doubt, the biggest take away I got out of my time as editor-in-chief was realizing that I can’t produce a paper by myself. I know, that sounds like it should’ve been obvious, but in the midst of all that is deadlines and breaking news, it is easy to forget how much I needed and relied on my fellow editors and writers. I don’t think I expressed my gratitude enough while I was editor-in-chief, but these people really made my experience what it was.

Thank you, Collegian family!


The Hidden Chapter

13808443545_80d8a868b2_zAs I sit here devouring a pint of chocolate peanut butter cup gelato (Talenti‘s to be exact) I am at a loss for words (I know, that’s ironic) when I think about what just happened in the last two days. I created this blog to document my “journey to journalism.” That said, this post not only falls under the criteria of “stuff I need to blog about” but it is centered around what is arguably the biggest and most extreme decision I have made since coming to college.

You see, Monday was the first day of my junior year at HBU. After a long, tough summer as a camp counselor, disconnected from technology (which is why I haven’t posted in what seems like forever) I was extremely excited to be back. I bought my textbooks, unpacked my stuff (that took a while), and got ready to continue with all the organizations that I was involved in last semester. Little did I know that tomorrow, (Friday) I would no longer be a student at HBU and would begin the process to transfer as a full-time, online student at Regent University (as a government major). 

If you told me on Monday that I would be back at home in Hawaii next week, I would think you were crazy. I love HBU and even though I miss my family, I have such a great support system here. Plus, I was going to see my family during Christmas break. Why then would I make such a drastic decision to leave?

I don’t know if I ever posted about this, but my “college plan” included doing a study abroad Washington Journalism Center semester in D.C. and ideally, graduating early. This was something that I had been thinking about since before I came to college, and as my time here unfolded, it looked like I would be able to finish up my journalism classes through that program in D.C., come back to Houston, take summer classes, and graduate as a “baby senior” next August. Then I met with the dean of my department and he informed me that if I were to do the study abroad semester, I would have to pay my school’s tuition along with the full tuition of the program ($15,000 not including food and transportation). In other words, I would be paying two tuitions for one semester.

Obviously, that left me with a huge financial problem, but that wasn’t the only issue. Most of my journalism classes were supposed to be covered by the credits I would earn in D.C. so my plan to graduate early also went out the door. On top of that, my school’s School of Fine Arts, and more specifically the journalism program, is going through a transitional stage. I’m not going to try to explain it all, but simply put, there isn’t really a program for those who want to go into reporting/news media. When I took all of that into consideration, I felt, in terms of my education, I had hit a roadblock.

So, here I am. Realizing that the older you get, the more frequent and extreme unexpected situations and changes become. In a sense, I’m learning to get used to it and make the most of it, but here’s to hoping that I won’t have to make a decision like this again in the near future. Apparently, this week marks the beginning of a new chapter in my life, except I did not see this one coming. 


New Role. New Chapter.

For some reason, I feel like the changes in between each semester get bigger and more drastic as my time in college progresses. A week ago, I took my last final and said “goodbye” to my third semester at Houston Baptist University, and said “hello” to the biggest journalistic opportunity I’ve had since I went to WJMC. Starting next semester, I will take on my new position as editor-in-chief of The Collegian (my university’s newspaper)!

This was definitely something that came out of the blue. I can definitely say that going into this past semester, I had no idea or even intent on becoming the editor-in-chief any time soon.

While I’m definitely excited about this position, I’m also scared…to death. Now I will have to pay closer attention to the way pages are formatted and watch out for those minor, seemingly trivial errors. For example, whether or not the way I wrote “editor-in-chief” in this post is AP Style (it probably isn’t).

My first picture as a "contributing writer" for The Collegian, a year and a half ago. I was so excited just to have this notebook (it made me feel "official").

My first picture as a “contributing writer” for The Collegian, a year and a half ago. I was so excited just to have this notebook (it made me feel “official”).

As I begin to research and look at other top ranked college newspapers, I realize that there is so much one can do, but I can’t do it all. As with most big changes in life, I’ll just have to take a deep breath and take it one step at a time. I know this sounds like I’m completely terrified of this new role (and to some extent, I am) but I am also extremely grateful. Like I said earlier, this wasn’t even something that I’d dare to dream about, yet I’ve been blessed with this amazing experience of a lifetime. That said, I know some way, somehow, I will survive (oh, and it definitely helps that my fellow editors are really supportive and fun to work with!) So, buckle in cause, next year, this journey to journalism is going to get bumpy.